Politics

Dale Peck is the Worst Critic of His Generation

The New Republic has reached DEEP into its nostalgia file and brought us the astonishing return of Dale Peck. Before we get to the insane stuff, let’s have some fun with the opening sentences:

One of the worst things I ever did happened in 1992. I was leaving the bar called The Bar (RIP) on Second Avenue and 4th Street to go to a party called Tattooed Love Child at another bar, Fez, located in the basement of Time Cafe (RIP x 2). TLC was held on Wednesdays (Thursdays?), and I often went to The Bar after work for a few hours so I wouldn’t have to go all the way home first. 

NYC provincialism doesn’t get much more provincial than “surely nothing could be more fascinating than the detailed itinerary of my drinking schedule on a Wednesday night thirty years ago.” Did you know that in [years in which I was in my mid-to-late-20s] New York City was alone among the world’s major urban centers in having establishments with unreliably cleaned restrooms in which one could exchange money for alcoholic beverages? Perhaps someone could finally write a novel or memoir telling this story to the broader public.

The third graf about what it nominally an article about Pete Buttigieg continues to wank on in this vein — The New Yorker sucked because it didn’t publish the right kind of fiction, i.e. fiction written by Dale Peck, and anyone who thinks otherwise is plainly an unfuckable neoliberal:

He asked where I was going and I told him. He asked if he could go with me and I told him he could go to Fez if he wanted but he shouldn’t think he was going with me. He came. I quickly learned that he’d mastered the art of speaking in questions, which put me in the awkward position of answering him or ignoring him, which made me feel rude even though I’d told him I wasn’t interested. When he found out I was a writer he got excited and said I must love the New Yorker! I told him I hated the New Yorker. He asked how I could hate the New Yorker and I told him that besides the fact that the New Yorker published shitty fiction (plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose), and the only gay fiction it published was assimilationist and boring, there was also the fact that an editor there (Dan Menaker, if we’re naming names) had rejected a story of mine by suggesting in his correspondence with my agent (by which I mean that he wasn’t embarrassed to write this down, let alone worried about repercussions) that psychological problems were preventing me from creating effective fiction. (By the way, fuck you, Dan.) None of which made any sense to Gar. 

I don’t think this interminable anecdote is portraying poor Gar in the light Peck thinks it is.

Anyway, these highly uninteresting tales of Dale Peck’s Manhattan youth are a prelude to an argument that Mayor Pete shouldn’t be the Dem nominee because he’s not the right kind of gay:

All this makes Mary Pete different from every other left-leaning neoliberal in exactly zero ways. Because let’s face it. The only thing that distinguishes the mayor of South Bend from all those other well-educated reasonably intelligent white dudes who wanna be president is what he does with his dick (and possibly his ass, although I get a definite top-by-default vibe from him, which is to say that I bet he thinks about getting fucked but he’s too uptight to do it). So let’s dish the dish, homos. You know and I know that Mary Pete is a gay teenager. He’s a fifteen-year-old boy in a Chicago bus station wondering if it’s a good idea to go home with a fifty-year-old man so that he’ll finally understand what he is. He’s been out for, what, all of four years, and if I understand the narrative, he married the first guy he dated. And we all know what happens when gay people don’t get a real adolescence because they spent theirs in the closet: they go through it after they come out. And because they’re adults with their own incomes and no parents to rein them in they do it on steroids (often literally). If Shortest Way Home (I mean really, can you think of a more treacly title?) makes one thing clear, Mary Pete was never a teenager. But you can’t run away from that forever. Either it comes out or it eats you up inside. It can be fun, it can be messy, it can be tragic, it can be progenitive, transformative, ecstatic, or banal, but the last thing I want in the White House is a gay man staring down 40 who suddenly realizes he didn’t get to have all the fun his straight peers did when they were teenagers. I’m not saying I don’t want him to shave his chest or do Molly or try being the lucky Pierre (the timing’s trickier than it looks, but it can be fun when you work it out). These are rites of passage for a lot of gay men, and it fuels many aspects of gay culture. But like I said, I don’t want it in the White House. I want a man whose mind is on his job, not what could have been—or what he thinks he can still get away with.

Oh.

Anyway, excited for TNR to hire two Brooklyn “only Bernie can make anorexia great again” podcasters to launch a semi-ironic reboot of THE SPINE.

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