Military

Hundreds of veterans, military personnel pay respects to veteran without family

In a show of support for our U.S. Armed Forces, Baltimore National Cemetery held an unaccompanied veteran burial Thursday morning. Capt. Phillip Brown had no living family members left to give him a proper burial, but his military brothers and sisters came to make sure he got the respect he deserved. More than 300 veterans and active duty military personnel showed up to pay respects at an unaccompanied veteran burial for Brown at Baltimore National Cemetery.Army veteran Clinton Townsend made the trip all the way from Lorton, Virginia.”I don’t think no human being should ever die alone. We are social creatures and we are bonded. No one should leave this world with no one saying goodbye,” Townsend said.There was no picture, but Brown had quite a decorated past. He joined the Army in 1966 and was an infantry officer in Vietnam. Brown earned the combat infantryman badge, two Bronze Stars, a Purple Heart, six air medals and two Army commendation metals.Brown was honorably discharged in 1980 as a captain. He died at his home in Harve de Grace last year. Brown’s only friend received his flag.”Quite a turnout, but he deserved it. He served the country, and it’s the right thing to do,” Brown’s friend said.Services like these are being conducted around the country almost weekly, and while there is a certain sadness associated with no family members around, the military and veteran presence makes all the difference.”I have a special place in my heart for infantrymen of all services and countries, so when we found out about Captain Brown, it was a very easy decision to round up some fellow infantry types to come today,” Army veteran Houston Matney said.

In a show of support for our U.S. Armed Forces, Baltimore National Cemetery held an unaccompanied veteran burial Thursday morning.

Capt. Phillip Brown had no living family members left to give him a proper burial, but his military brothers and sisters came to make sure he got the respect he deserved.

More than 300 veterans and active duty military personnel showed up to pay respects at an unaccompanied veteran burial for Brown at Baltimore National Cemetery.

Army veteran Clinton Townsend made the trip all the way from Lorton, Virginia.

“I don’t think no human being should ever die alone. We are social creatures and we are bonded. No one should leave this world with no one saying goodbye,” Townsend said.

There was no picture, but Brown had quite a decorated past.

He joined the Army in 1966 and was an infantry officer in Vietnam. Brown earned the combat infantryman badge, two Bronze Stars, a Purple Heart, six air medals and two Army commendation metals.

Brown was honorably discharged in 1980 as a captain. He died at his home in Harve de Grace last year.

Brown’s only friend received his flag.

“Quite a turnout, but he deserved it. He served the country, and it’s the right thing to do,” Brown’s friend said.

Services like these are being conducted around the country almost weekly, and while there is a certain sadness associated with no family members around, the military and veteran presence makes all the difference.

“I have a special place in my heart for infantrymen of all services and countries, so when we found out about Captain Brown, it was a very easy decision to round up some fellow infantry types to come today,” Army veteran Houston Matney said.

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